Books

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Anthony Joseph Agostinelli. Stan Kenton: The Many Musical Moods of His Orchestras. AJ Agostinelli, 1986.
Tony Agostinelli Stan Kenton: The Many Musical Moods of His Orchestras
Lillian Arganian. Stan Kenton: The Man and His Music. Artistry Press, 1989.
Stan kenton The man And His Music by Lillian Arganian
Book review

Marge Hofacre. "Stan Kenton. The Man and His Music, by Lillian Arganian."
Marge Hofacre's No Name Jazz News. December 1989. 40.
Carol Easton. Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton. New York, Morrow, 1973.
Straight Ahead The Story of Stan kenton by Carol Easton
Book reviews

"Carol Easton, Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton." Coda. March 1975. 32-33.

Thomas M Keefe, Thomas M. "Carol Easton, Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton."
IAJRC Journal 15 (November, 1983): 29.

"Carol Easton, Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton." Instrument. April 1975. 20.

"Carol Easton, Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton." Jazz Digest. February 1974. 18.

"Carol Easton, Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton." Jazz Podium. February 1975. 26.

"Carol Easton, Straight Ahead: The Story of Stan Kenton." Orkester Journalen. February 1974. 13.
Edward F Gabel. Stan Kenton: The Early Years, 1941-1947. Lake Geneva, WI: Balboa Books, 1993.
Stan Kenton The Early Years by Edward Gabel
From the Publisher:

Here's the story of Stan Kenton and his orchestra from 1941 to '47 by a man who was there. Ed Gabel was a high school kid when he first heard the Kenton Orchestra in Chicago in 1942. Before that day was over Stan had offered him a job! For the next five years - virtually the entire life of Kenton's "Artistry in Rhythm" Orchestra, Gabel ("Gabe") helped out with everything from wrestling equipment to choosing the songs to be played on live remote radio broadcasts. There were tense military flights heading for performances of the Bob Hope radio show, long days and nights at the Paramount Theater in New York, and all the problems (and fun) of a road band trying to keep going during the war. The book provides fresh insight into the dynamic, legendary leader who would not be denied his dream! Foreword by Pete Rugolo.
Charles Garrod. Stan Kenton and His Orchestra, Volume One, 1940-1951. Zephyrsville, FL: Joyce Record Club, 1984.
Stan Kenton Charles Garrod
Charles Garrod. Stan Kenton and His Orchestra, Volume Two, 1952-1959. Zephyrsville, FL: Joyce Music Publication, 1984.
Stan Kenton Charles Garrod
Charles Garrod. Stan Kenton and His Orchestra, Volume Three, 1960-1979. Zephyrsville, FL: Joyce Record Club, 1991.
Stan Kenton Charles Garrod
Steven D Harris. The Kenton Kronicles: A Biography of Modern America's Man of Music, Stan Kenton. Pasadena: Dynaflow, 2003.
The Kenton Kronicles by Steven D. Harris
William F Lee III and Audree Coke Kenton. Stan Kenton: Artistry in Rhythm. Creative Press of Los Angeles, 1980.
Artistry in Rhythm by William Lee
Book reviews

Dave Dexter Jr. "Kenton's Career Documented. Stan Kenton Artistry in Rhythm by William F Lee."
Billboard. 22 November 1980. 42.

John F Johnson. American Music. 2.3 (1984): 106-107.

G Fehrmann. "Stan Kenton—Artistry in Rhythm, Vom William Lee." Jazz Podium. May 1982. 62.

John McDonough. "Book Review. Stan Kenton—Artistry in Rhythm, by William Lee."
Down Beat. September 1981. 64-65.

"Stan Kenton—Artistry in Rhythm, by William Lee." Jazz Educators Journal. 1982. 81.

"Stan Kenton—Artistry in Rhythm, by William Lee." Jazz Podium. May 1982. 16-20, 62.

"Stan Kenton—Artistry in Rhythm, by William Lee." Keyboard. May 1981. 61.

"Stan Kenton—Artistry in Rhythm, by William Lee." Variety. 14 January 1981.
Christopher Anthony Pirie and Siegfried Mueller. Artistry in Kenton: The Bio-Discography of Stan Kenton and His Music. Vol. 1. Mueller, 1969.
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Book reviews

"C.A. Pirie and S. Mueller 'Artistry in Kenton, Volume 1: The Bio-Discography of Stan Kenton and His Music'." Jazz Journal. September 1969. 12.

"C.A. Pirie and S. Mueller 'Artistry in Kenton, Volume 1: The Bio-Discography of Stan Kenton and His Music'." Jazz Magazine. June 1969. 17-18.

Alun Morgan. "C.A. Pirie and S. Mueller 'Artistry in Kenton, Volume 1: The Bio-Discography of Stan Kenton and His Music'." Jazz Monthly. July 1970. 30-31.

"C.A. Pirie and S. Mueller 'Artistry in Kenton, Volume 1: The Bio-Discography of Stan Kenton and His Music'." Melody Maker. 21 June 1969. 22.
Christopher Anthony Pirie. Artistry in Kenton, Book One. 2 vols. Ipswich GB: 1995.
Artistry In Kenton, Book One, Primary by Chris Pirie
"Book one - Primary" recounts authoritatively, the factual histories of The Radio Transcription, The Victory Phonograph project,as well as identifying the travesties and bigotries which have destroyed the factual backgrounds of both "Jazz" and "Swing" as exhaustively alleged in the millions of published documents masquerading as "Jazz History."

– author

Artistry In Kenton, Book One, Orchestral Historiography by Chris Pirie
Introductions and Foreword by Shorty Rogers and Frank Sinatra, which is chronologically unfinished (terminating in 1953).

The biographical data is no sycophantic adulation of the leader Stanley Newcomb Kenton but portrays him as a foul-mouthed and unpleasant personality, musically gifted but tainted with the problems inherent in his regard for those close to him. Written by his friend, Chris Pirie.it is hoped that a continuation (from 1953) will be possible in the future. Both volumes are packed with superb monochrome and colour photographs. As a limited edition the work was sold out long before published on a pre-publication subscription basis. Anyone wishing to know more about future publishing should contact Chris Pirie via email.

– author

Dr. Dietrich Schulz-Köhn. Stan Kenton. Ein Porträt. Wetzlar: Pegasus Verlag, 1961. Jazz Bücherei.
Michael Sparke and Pete Venudor. Kenton on Capitol & Creative World. A Discography. Lake Geneva, WI: Balboa Books, 1994.
Stan Kenton The Studio Sessions by Michael Sparke
Michael Sparke and Pete Venudor. Stan Kenton : The Studio Sessions: A Discography. Lake Geneva, WI: Balboa Books, 1998.
Stan Kenton The Studio Sessions by Michael Sparke
Michael Sparke. Stan Kenton: This Is An Orchestra!. Denton: University of North Texas Press, 2011.
Stan Kenton This Is An Orchestra by Michael Sparke
Book reviews

Wall Street Journal Review by Will Friedwald

Marcia Hillman. "Stan Kenton. This Is An Orchestra, by Michael Sparke." All About Jazz. July 2011. 34.

Gordon Jack. "Stan Kenton. This Is An Orchestra, by Michael Sparke." Jazz Journal. July 2010. 11.

Frank Tirro. "Stan Kenton. This Is An Orchestra, by Michael Sparke." American Music. 2011. 268-270.

Russ Spiegel “Stan Kenton: This is an Orchestra by Michael Sparke” Bulletin of the Society of American Music, Vol. XXXX, No. 1 (Winter, 2014)
http://american-music.org/publications/bulletin/2014/VolXL1-Winter2014.php

Peter Vacher. "Stan Kenton. This Is An Orchestra, by Michael Sparke." Jazzwise. August 2011. 53.

Book chapters and excerpts

Whitney Balliett. "Artistry in Limbo." The Sound of Jazz. 46 Pieces on Jazz. London: 1961. 27-29.
Betty Bennett. The Ladies Who Sing with the Band. Lanham MD: Scarecrow, 2000.
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Kurt Dietrich. Jazz Bones. The World of Jazz Trombone. Rottenburg: Advance Music, 2005. 295- 312.
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Purchase Print edition

This book is a masterpiece! Kurt Dietrich has already established his reputation as an authority on jazz with his excellent book on the trombonists of the Duke Ellington orchestra, "Duke's 'Bones, Ellington's Great Trombonists." His work in this wonderful collection of history, anecdotes, and stories is extremely well researched and documented. He traces the history of jazz trombone from its early inception through the big band era, bebop, new music, european, world music, up to the present. One of the strengths of this book is his inclusion of many lesser-know trombonists, some of whom were 'monsters' albeit overlooked. Although a serious document, "Jazz 'Bones" is very enjoyable reading. "Jazz 'Bones" will certainly take its place alongside the best volumes on music history and is without question required reading for all trombonists and lovers of jazz. Bravo, Kurt Dietrich!

—Jiggs Whigham

George Duvivier and Edward Berger. Basically Speaking. An Oral History of George Duvivier. Metuchen, NJ: 1993. 84-85.
Basically Speaking. An Oral History of George Duvivier
WHENEVER I MENTION THE INFLUENCE Stan Kenton had on my writing, people look at me in disbelief. I'm aware of the criticism leveled at Kenton, but no one else was attempting what he was. The problem is that people compared his band to a swing band. He never claimed to be Basie or Ellington or Lunceford. But what he had was unique shading, interesting arrangements, and superb musicians. People complain, “It's so loud!” Well, it was loud because he had five trumpets, five trombones, and five saxes, to which he added different experimental instruments. If you go back and listen to the records for what they were—the whole “Artistry” series, the suites—they’re extremely interesting and some were very beautiful. They represented a new direction in music.

I sought out Stan Kenton in Newark when he was doing a concert there. I went backstage and introduced myself. He was a very warm man, and we got to know each other pretty well. We corresponded, and used to calI each other often. Once, the percussionist Candido was scheduled to do a performance of an original of his with Stan in Birdland, and he asked me to arrange it for him. As I was sitting backstage working on it, Stan walked by. He glanced at the score paper and said, “I didn't know you arranged.” Two weeks later, he called and asked me to join the band! I was flattered, but I was working with Johnny Smith at the time, and didn’t feel like doing any more one-nighters. But I always kept in touch with Stan. Anyone who had any doubts about the effect his orchestra could have should have caught his concert at the Paramount just before he first “retired” in the late 1940s. Their closing number was "The Peanut Vendor," which, of course, had been played to death. Shelly Manne borrowed Jimmy Crawford's Chinese cymbal for the entire engagement. It was so big that he had set it up to his right on a separate stand. After the band played "Peanut Vendor" as we knew it, they went into a riff. Each man packed up some son of Latin instrument and started playing at until it was one big sound. Then Shelly turned around. and very quietly began a sizzle. It kept growing and growing until it made your hair stand on end. The band suddenly put down the Latin instruments and picked up their own, with the sizzle still going. They played the final figure, and after the last chord the whole theater rose up as one. It was absolutely electrifying. I can only equate it with the effect the Lunceford band had on people. Kenton himself was an imposing but congenial figure on stage, striding around in front of the band. He used the oddest count­ offs, partially bent over in a crouch. Sometimes the theatrics could get out of hand. I used to kid Eddie Safranski about having to play a bass solo with florescent gloves on!

So, due to various circumstances, I turned down invitations to join two of the top orchestras: Ellington and Kenton. I never got the chance to turn Basie down. He used to kid me by saying, “I’d love to have you, but I can’t afford you!” I did get to play and record with him on several occasions, however.
Peter Erskine. No Beethoven: An Autobiography & Chronicle of Weather Report. 1 ed. Santa Monica, CA: Fuzzy Music, 2013.
Basically Speaking. An Oral History of George Duvivier
"No Beethoven" chronicles the life and times of drummer Peter Erskine, with the legendary band Weather Report being the nexus to this first-hand account. Erskine was in the midst of the modern American jazz music scene as it underwent its most dynamic change. From the last days of the big band era to the height of fusion...there never was a band quite like Weather Report, and there has never been a more insightful, personal or authentic telling of that band's story and the musicians — Joe Zawinul, Wayne Shorter, and Jaco Pastorius — who changed music forever...to the European wave as represented by Manfred Eicher's ECM label, to the dawning of the age of the musician as entrepreneur and educator...Peter Erskine is a musician of his times with an incredibly rich story to tell. Many stories to tell! He was there...and now you can be, too. With never-before published photographs.

"No Beethoven" includes chapters dedicated to Weather Report and the musicians Joe Zawinul, Jaco Pastorius and Wayne Shorter, plus the bands Steps Ahead, Steely Dan, and artists such as Elvin Jones, Joni Mitchell, Freddie Hubbard, Diana Krall, Steve Gadd, producer Manfred Eicher, composers John Williams and Mark-Anthony Turnage, et al. The book provides a revealing look at the creative process involved in performing music on-stage and in the recording studio, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at how the musical instrument industry operates.

This is a book for all musicians and fans of music. As famed drummer and Rush founder Neil Peart writes: "'No Beethoven' is among the best musical autobiographies I have read. Peter's story is absorbing and compelling, full of well-drawn characters and incidents both humorous and serious. It flows with the same ease and naturalness as his drumming, and under that good-humored gloss, it conveys the same profundity of experience and ideas. This book should be read not only by every drummer, but by every musician. Even dedicated "amateurs" of music will find it entertaining and worthwhile."
Gary Giddins. "Stan Kenton. Big." Visions of Jazz. The First Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. 327- 330.
Ted Gioia. "Big Bands Out West. The Kenton Writers." West Coast Jazz. Modern Jazz in California, 1945-1960. New York: 1992. 144-151.
Basically Speaking. An Oral History of George Duvivier
Mark C Gridley. "Stan Kenton." Jazz Styles. History and Analysis. Englewood Cliffs NJ: 1993. 180-184.
Helene LaFaro-Fernandez. Jade Visions: The Life and Music of Scott LaFaro. 1 ed. Denton, Texas: University of North Texas Press, 2009. 182-183. North Texas Lives of Musician Series 4.
Basically Speaking. An Oral History of George Duvivier
Lothar Lewien. Charlie Mariano. Tears of Sound - Wanderer Zwischen Den Musikwelten. St. Andrä-Wördern: Hannibal Verlag, 1993. 73-78.
Basically Speaking. An Oral History of George Duvivier
Henry J Levy. The Time Revolution: By Henry J. (Hank) Levy. With an introd. by Stan Kenton. Los Angeles: Creative World, 1973.
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Art Pepper and Laurie Pepper. "On the Road with Stan Kenton's Band 1946-1952." Straight Life. The Story of Art Pepper. London: 1979. 93-121.
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George T Simon. The Big Bands. New York: Macmillan, 1967.
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Dissertations

Michael Cadó. "The Big Band. From Dance Band to Jazz Orchestra." MA Thesis. York University. Toronto, Ontario, 2004.

Richard Samuel Fine. "The Birth of Jeru: Gerry Mulligan's Early Composing/Arranging Career (1945-1953)." PhD Dissertation. University of Maryland, College Park, 2010.

Robert LeRoy Hughes Jr. "Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars. Modern Jazz in California 1952-1959." PhD Thesis. Washington University. Saint Louis, Missouri, 2002.

Wilson Milton Lindskoog. "An Analysis of the Style of the Stan Kenton Orchestra." MA Thesis. Eastman School of Music, 1948.

Magnani, Massimo. "Il Contrabbasso Nell'orchestra Di Stan Kenton: Eddie Safranski." University of Bologna, 1990.

Robert Badgett Morgan. "The Music and Life of Robert Graettinger." DMA Thesis. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne, 1974.